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WLS-friendly Cookies: Nik-a-doodles…

I love baking cookies. Mostly because it is the ONLY realm of science I can truly wrap my head around.

Having said that, these cookies were challenging! My mission: a higher protein, lower carb cookie recipe that didn’t have 8 million ingredients! My goal was 7-8. I’m going to go through this recipe but also through all the missteps I encountered in hopes that you can figure out how you’d like to approach this process in order to make different flavors!

First, we should go over my personal rules about cookies:

  1. I don’t make cookies except when I have a plan to share them with others.
  2. With the exception of my Christmas Eve party I don’t make big batches of cookies. That’s why any cookie recipes you see here on BF rarely yield more than a dozen cookies.
  3. I hold myself accountable to cookies! I eat them, I gotta report how many and when.

Ok, then. Snickerdoodles! I love them. Especially this time of year. I renamed them because I am vain but forgive me…my African-American soul did not like the sound of “Nikerdoodles.” Yeah, yeah…a new day and yadda, yadda. MOVING ON!

Here is the final recipe I came up with for these:

Nik-a-doodles

Wet ingredients:

  • 1 stick of low-cal butter substitute (I use Blue Bonnet Light – and yes, yes I know this is blasphemy to some of you. If you want to use butter it’s your choice but the calories will be significantly higher than the ones I quote below!)
  • Either 1 c. of Splenda or whatever baking-appropriate sugar substitute you like, in an amount that measures to the equivalent of 1 c. of sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/4 c. sugar-free Brown Sugar Cinnamon syrup (or, in the absence of that, the same amount of sugar-free pancake syrup and a generous dash of cinnamon)

Dry Ingredients:

  • 1 c. low-carb baking mix (Bob’s Red Mill makes a good one – check your grocery store’s organic or health food aisle!)
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. cream of tartar (if you’ve never used it before it’s in the spice aisle)
  • 1 additional tsp. cinnamon

Directions:

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. This was the first discovery I made about these cookies. When I baked them at 350 they came out cakey, almost like a muffin top. They need higher heat!

In a bowl, mix together the butters and sugar substitute (and syrup if you are using it). It won’t “cream” like sugar does. In fact, it looks a bit like popcorn. Look:

After the butter and sugar substitute are well mixed, add in your egg, mixing well and, finally, the vanilla.

In a separate bowl, sift together your dry ingredients. Now you don’t HAVE to sift if you don’t want to but if you’ve ever used Atkins mix you know there are some pretty large grains in there (that’s what makes it low carb). If your batter is chunky, your cookie will look chunky. So sift!

Tip the wet ingredients into the dry and I’d suggest using a mixer. Again, whatever the consistency of the batter is, the cookies will be the same. My first few batches I mixed by hand and the cookies were “lumpy.”

So let’s talk about the dough, shall we? It will be soft. You will not be able to roll these unless you refrigerate your dough first. But even then, with non-traditional cookies I find you have to put them in the oven in the shape you want them to come out. So I drop the dough on the sheet and then take a spoon and flatten they out into a round disc. This is how I got the cookies above round and flat. If you don’t do that, most likely they won’t spread much.
If you used to like them rolled in cinnamon and sugar you can mix about 1 oz. of sugar substitute and about 1 heaping teaspoon of cinnamon in a bowl and drop your cookie dough in that and shake it around before baking! (You still want to flatten your dough though.)
Alrighty then…you guys must be wearing me down on my “no stats” policy (not really…this is just an exception). I ran these through the recipe maker on LiveStrong and here’s what I got (if you’re on LS, you can click here to see the full stats):
Per cookie:
Nik-a-doodles (per cookie)
86 calories
4.8g fat
4.87g carbs
1.5g fiber
>1g sugar
5.53g protein
Vs. Traditional Homemade Snickerdoodles (per cookie)
120 calories
6g fat
15g carbs
0g fiber
7g sugars
1g protein
So what does this teach us? A cookie, as always, is a TREAT! But you can even play with your treats to add a bit of protein punch to them. Besides this recipe yielded me exactly 12 cookies. That’s two (at best) for me – IF I get those before the divas become aware of them – and a few for the divas and even some for the friends they always seem to have hanging around!
You may ask why I did not use protein powder and my answer would be because the consistency of protein powder in baking is more conducive to pies and cake-type things than in cookies. There may be recipes for cookies out there that call for protein powder but they never seem to work well for ME. And if I can’t get it right I’m not even going to try to sell you guys on them!
But you know what I always say. Play with your food! If you come up with a recipe that works, send it and a pic to bariatricfoodie@yahoo.com!
WLS-friendly Cookies: Nik-a-doodles...
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    WLS-friendly Cookies: Nik-a-doodles...
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      7 comments

      1. Ding!! Ding!!! Ding!!! Winner winner chicken dinner!!!!!

      2. Kevin,

        I get a chicken dinner? Coolness!

      3. Thank you, thank you for not using protein powder!! I was holding my breath hoping you would not use it!! 🙂

      4. Can't wait to try these! I knew there had to be a way to healthify snickerdoodles and I bet non ops won't know the difference.

      5. mmm Yummy will most def try this out!! 🙂

      6. Mail these to me too please.

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